George Johnson, Calgary Herald, January 18, 2013

CALGARY — Any speedskater capable of dwarfing the towering figure of Jeremy Wotherspoon must be something special indeed.

“Actually,” protests Kristina Groves, holding up an I’ll-stop-you-right-there hand, “I don’t know if that’s true. When we did a mock-up of the picture I chose for the banner, my body was, well ... enormous. I mean, enormous. But that picture is being zoomed out, a bit, so it won’t be quite as, uh, overpowering as we thought at first.

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AuthorKristina Groves

Dan Plouffe, SportsOttawa.com, January 10, 2013

4-time Olympic speed skating medalist Kristina Groves to return home for 2012 Ottawa Sports Awards gala & have female athlete of the year trophy named after her

OTTAWA - Memories of frozen hands, chilling temperatures and whipping winds typically aren’t fond childhood recollections. But for Kristina Groves, they’re nostalgic moments from her teenage years when she and her Ottawa Pacers friends would go to Brewer Park during their Christmas holidays and help the volunteer crew maintain the outdoor long-track oval.

“We would bring out the fire hoses and flood it for a couple hours in the morning,” Groves recounts. “Then we’d go back to one of the guys’ houses and play Pictionary for hours. And then we’d go back to the oval and flood it again.”

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AuthorKristina Groves

Richard White, For the Calgary Herald, April 5, 2012

She’s a four-time Olympic medallist and three -time 1,500-metre World Cup Champion.

She is also a community advocate and has been for some time. For many years, she has been an ambassador for Right to Play and Clean Air Champions.

The former focuses on improving the lives of children in the most disadvantaged areas of the world through sport, while the latter is a school-based program educating children about climate change and active transportation.

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AuthorKristina Groves

Kristina Groves, CBC Sports, March 24, 2012

It’s the honest truth that most of the news we hear about First Nations communities in Canada is overwhelmingly bad. I pay close enough attention to current affairs to at least know that. The most recent wave of bad news to wash over the country has been about the remote Attawapiskat First Nation in Northern Ontario. Did anybody see? Did anybody hear? Maybe it’s the relentless barrage of global tragedies that makes us numb to more bad news.

We either do not believe or support what we hear. We are loath to admit that this is the reality in Canada, our Canada, that Aboriginal children are reaching suicide rates substantially higher than elsewhere in Canada, and the world.

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AuthorKristina Groves

Kristina Groves: Award-winning speed skater, Olympic medalist, environmentalist and Bullfrog Founders Club member

A four-time Olympic medalist, Kristina Groves is one of Canada's most respected and accomplished athletes. Picking up two silver medals at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, she went on to qualify for five speed skating events at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. In Vancouver, she took home the silver medal in the 1500 m and the bronze in the 3000 m.

Of all Canadian speed skaters, Groves holds the highest medal count (13) in the World Single Distances Championships. For the last three years, she has been the overall World Cup winner for the 1500 m. She also holds the world record, with her teammates Christine Nesbitt and Brittany Schussler, for the Team Pursuit; their team set the world record in 2009.

Bullfrog Power recently caught up with Groves to chat with her on the topics of speed skating, the 2010 Olympics and her environmentalism.

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AuthorKristina Groves

Randy Starkman, The Toronto Star, September 21, 2011

Kristina Groves is toying with the idea of a book about the lessons learned along the way as an athlete.

A fitting title might be: The little speed-skating engine that could.

That's the thing about Groves, who announced her retirement Wednesday in Calgary. She was never a can't-miss prospect, never the star on a powerhouse Canadian women's team that also featured Cindy Klassen, Clara Hughes and Christine Nesbitt.

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AuthorKristina Groves

Donna Spencer, Canadian Press, September 21, 2011

CALGARY — Kristina Groves resisted the idea she would retire from speedskating until a late August summer camping trip with friends.

While the feeling had slowly been creeping up on her, it was then the Olympic medallist and former world champion realized she was ready to embrace life after speedskating.

“The feeling I had in those races when I really nailed it, was really addicting,” Groves said Wednesday during a news conference. “Because of that, it never really occurred to me I wouldn’t want to do this anymore, but the fact is, that little urge to win that’s been there for so long has just slowly faded away in the last year.

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AuthorKristina Groves

Donna Spencer, The Toronto Star, June 24, 2011

CALGARY—A “bed-in for sustainability” by speedskater Kristina Groves has drawn the attention of Yoko Ono, the originator of the protest-in-a-bed concept with late husband and Beatles member, John Lennon.

Groves received an email from Ono prior to Friday’s bed-in at a downtown Calgary bed boutique. Groves, a winner of four Olympic medals, entertained civic leaders and politicians in a bed and discussed ways to make the city more environmentally sustainable.

Ono and Lennon held two-week bed-ins in 1969 in both Amsterdam and Montreal to promote peace. They invited the world’s press to join them. Groves was stunned to receive a message from Ono.

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AuthorKristina Groves

Randy Starkman, The Toronto Star, February 21, 2010

RICHMOND, B.C.-In the final 200 metres of her sport’s toughest race, one that often leaves speed skaters with the taste of blood in their lungs, Kristina Groves’ heart and mind were shouting “Go.”

Unfortunately, her legs were screaming “No.”

Meanwhile, Dutch skater Ireen Wust had one eye on the big screen watching Groves in the final pair, knowing that for much of the race the Canadian was on pace to knock her off the top of the podium.

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AuthorKristina Groves

Randy Starkman, The Toronto Star, February 6, 2010

Finally, there was money on the table for Kristina Groves.

As bountiful as the medals have been in her speed-skating career, the sponsorship offers have been just as scarce.

So when a company came forward in this Olympic season wanting to buy one of the logo spots on the chest of her racing suit, it was a pretty big opportunity for an athlete who's never cashed in on her success.

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AuthorKristina Groves